To the Editor:

After the massacres in Ohio and Texas in August, we were all left with a sense of utter helplessness.

Like so many other impossible missions, we continue to look on with no real solution in sight.

A political statement here would only contribute to the white noise of mass outrage and frustration.

Criminals do not abide by current laws and will only continue to find ways around future ones.

In most cases, these people have touched other lives.

As a former counselor, I do not believe that individuals carrying such poisonous baggage are able to successfully hide their homicidal ideations from the people around them.

One such murder that took place in Woodbury in the 1990s was the poster child for friends, neighbors and families turning a blind eye.

In this case, parents of a severely disturbed adult son, not only failed to warn local authorities of their son's intent, they supplied him with the weapon.

Harry Cohen, a New Milford lawyer who died in May of this year at the age of 98, went up against the kind of stone walling we still see today.

It was a David and Goliath marathon that resulted in a surprising decision, and a new precedent was established.

Until this case was successfully tried and won, families were not considered to be responsible for their loved one's violent acts.

The decision is cited in similar cases to this day.

“Murder In Woodbury; A Duty To Warn” is based upon this case and Cohen’s involvement.

In the 21st century, there is a massive outbreak of violent acts at the hand of the quietly insane.

Close friends and family members report having no prior knowledge that the perpetrator was about to shoot randomly through an elementary school or public gathering.

Upon closer examination, it is usually revealed that the offender had a long history of mental impairment.

Days before a fatal shooting, the individual usually showed increased agitation, and in most cases, had made threatening statements.

In a world where violence has become the accepted norm, where does responsibility lie?

We should not act solely because we are required by law to do the right thing. We should protect the innocent to save humanity.

Jill Province

Waynesville, N.C.