To the Editor:

"We, the people."

During the recent elections, there was much talk about how President Barack Obama was ignoring or abusing the Constitution.

The cry went out to respect the Constitution as our founders intended.

Yet in all the rhetoric, there was no mention of the first three words of our Constitution, and arguably the three most important words ever said in a political sense.

We, the people.

These three words changed history. No longer would people be ruled by kings or dictators, but rather they would have the right to choose their leaders -- one vote for each person.

It is not written "we, the top 3 percent" or "we, the wealthy" or "we, the powerful."

Many have died defending this right which is the core of democracy.

Yet, in recent years, many laws restricting this right have been crafted and passed to make it more difficult for each citizen to cast his or her vote.

Shorter hours at the polls, new rules making it harder to vote absentee, new voter ID laws, eliminating Sunday voting hours are all designed to limit the vote of "we, the people."

Please don't insult our intelligence by claiming these new rules are designed to protect against voter fraud; it is virtually non-existent.

There are enough untruths coming out of Washington every day without adding this one.

No one denies money plays a major part in our election process, yet our Supreme Court seems to be more concerned with protecting the ability of money and corporations to express their political views than we, the people.

And big donors have the right to remain anonymous while we, the people, have to have voter ID.

Where is your voter ID, Mr. Corporation?

Is this the direction our founding fathers hoped our country would take?

Name one law passed in the last 10 years enacted to make voting easier.

With all the advantages of our new electronic world, surely someone will devise a solution to enable more people to vote.

Our last election for control of both houses of Congress drew only 37 percent of our voters -- a number that would be laughed at by many of the so-called third world countries which regularly turn out twice that percentage.

History reveals when the ruling class ignores or suppresses its populace, it sows the seeds of revolution (i.e., Rome, France, Egypt, Tunisia, etc.).

I am not suggesting we are anywhere near this point, but history reminds us we were borne out of a revolution over 200 years ago.

Remember, our representatives were elected to serve, not rule.

God Bless America and We, the People are simple words that define us -- all of us.

Richard P. Levy

Kent