Children build nature projects at Washington nonprofit

Children's Community School 6th Graders Jacely and Kayanna put finishing touches on their fort at Macricostas Preserve.

Children’s Community School 6th Graders Jacely and Kayanna put finishing touches on their fort at Macricostas Preserve.

Contributed photo

WASHINGTON — “What could you build with sticks, rocks, mud, and moss?” This question was put to Children’s Community School (CCS) students by Metamorphosis Project teaching artists Jenna Robb and Jason Killinger.

After in-school sessions studying, experimenting and imagining habitat structures and building techniques, CCS students spent the day at Steep Rock's Macricostas Preserve hiking, foraging and building their own fort. They worked collaboratively, using power tools and hands-on processes to create walls, fences, walkways, windows and furniture The three room fort is available for all to experience at Macricostas Preserve.

The Metamorphosis Project is an arts-integrated in-school program in its sixth year. It provides the opportunity for elementary school learners to experience project- and passion-based learning by integrating the arts into science and civics curricula, an announcement said.

To learn more about ASAP!, visit asapct.org.