The Sherman Library will present a program, “Marco Polo: The Silk Road & China, and the UN in Action,” Sept. 14 at 3:30 p.m.

Dr. Joseph J. Baxer, president of the United Nations of Connecticut will lead the program at the Sherman Center library.

Stories of the ancient Silk Road and the medieval journey of Marco Polo invite images of caravans hosting a veritable Babel of tongues and cooperation amid diversity as traders, diplomats and adventurers came in contact with one another.

The UN is not just an office building in Manhattan, but alive in action, rooted across a continent in which China reimagines the ancient routes at sea, on ice and through cyberspace.

Baxer, following an immersion in Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan, will explore the vitality and promise of the UN in action.

Baxer is previously a US representative to the United Nations for the London-based NGO, Strategies for Peace.

He is engaged in sustaining cultural diversity and mediating cross-cultural conflicts.

His focus involves creating the atmosphere/conditions in which reconciliation can occur. He has led seminars and lectured locally and internationally on conflict resolution and cross-cultural dialogue, including participation in international peace missions to Uganda, Tanzania, Ethiopia, Kenya and Nicaragua.

He has traveled extensively in Europe, both East and West; South America, and the Philippines with priority time in the Middle East

Ordained a priest, he is affiliated with the American Catholic Church.

Previous endeavors include serving as a high school principal in Connecticut, and teaching at Emory University, St. Joseph University, and the Hartford Seminary.

He has ministered in multicultural churches, directed a large inner-city homeless shelter/rehabilitation center, and served as Vicar General of an international Church Order in Rome, Italy.

He holds master degrees in philosophy and sociology and doctorates in theology and psychology.

His most recent book, published in English and French, is “An Intercultural Life, Exploring the Crossroads of Religion and Culture.”

He lives with his wife Barbara in Kent.

For more information, call 860-354-2455.